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Sakiro
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Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Well, i think i wll be the first one to make the first newbie question!

Reading the info in tutorials i want to start to eat more Low GI foods than high GI foods, but later i read about the difference of simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates, (i understand that complex have to work much harder to access the bonds to break the chain into individual sugars for absorption) so my question if a complex carbohydrate ars LOW GI per se .. or a food can have a HIGH GI and be Complex Carbohydrate too?


Low GI = Good

Low GI and Complex Carbohydrate = Very Good?


Hope i explained it well.


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Alex
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Hi dude  :  )

GI is effectively a measure of carbohydrate complexity, because it is based on carb-release speed in vivo. The body delays carb release in different foods by various means, so a food that is absorbed by the gut quickly doesn't necessarily have a fast release rate (for example fructose).

You also need to consider GL (Glycemic Load). GI does not take into account the "serving size" of each food and the amount of carbohydrates "one serving" contains. To work out the Glycemic Load of any food, use this formula:

(n/100)x g

Where 'n' is the GI and 'g' is the weight in grams of the serving.
If you need any more info just say.
Best,
AR


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Sakiro
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Ok got it.

Do you think when you are near to do a weight training sesion (like 30min/1 hour after earing) is better to eat High GI foods? or maybe a mix of high and low?

I read too that is good after doing weight training to eat some high GI food (probably with some proteins too) to "fuel" the muscles, is that true? (if you want to gain muscle)


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Alex
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

As long as your BMI is healthy, if you're training, or doing heavy work, and eating protein with high GI carbs, the best thing to do is include some low GI carbs in the same meal.

If your BMI isn't so healthy and/or you have high blood sugar/metabolic syndrome, you should do the full low GI diet to adjust the genome to a healthier BMI, before doing either weight training or a mixed diet.

See "Optimal nutrition for beginners" in the library, Nutrition section; there is a specialist diet for heavy work.
Best,
AR


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Mnemo
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Hi there,
   I'm looking for a trustworthy GI foods list.  Been finding a number of them that seem to have the numbers reversed.  One said that oatmeal (58) had a higher GI than a Snickers Bar (55).  What gives?


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Robert
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Hey.
  I don’t think an absolute list exists.   
Because GI is measured directly on human test subjects using non standardized foods, there is room for a lot of variables to creep in.  All the lists on the internet are compilations of research data from different researchers who may even use different testing methods.

For example, two findings for 
Snickers Bar® (M&M/Mars, USA) *

Hertzler S. Glycemic index of "energy" snack bars in normal volunteers. J Am Diet Assoc 2000; 100: 97-100.
Shows a GI of 68
Sydney University’s Glycemic Index Research Service (Human Nutrition Unit, University of Sydney, Australia), unpublished observations, 1995-2007.
shows GI of 43

Which one is right?  they could both be right, as companies provide different formulations of foods in different countries.  **

Snickers Bar® (Mars Confectionery, Australia)
Brand Miller JC, Wang B, McNeil Y, Swan V. The glycaemic index of more breads, breakfast cereals and snack products. Proc Nutr Soc Aust 1997; 21: 144 (abstr).
Shows a GI of 41 
which supports the hypothesis that Australian Mars Bars may have lower GI that USA equivalents.




Another confounding  variable is the type of processing, so one can’t just say “oatmeal”

Instant oatmeal porridge, made from packet   
has a GI of 83 according to
Yang YX, Wang HW, Cui HM, Wang Y, Y LD, Xiang SX, Zhou SY. Glycemic index of cereals and tubers produced in China. World J Gastroenterol 2006; 12(21): 3430-3.

Multi grain instant oatmeal, Regular and Cinnamon & Spice, President's Choice® Blue Menu™ 
has a GI of 55 according to
Glycemic Index Laboratories, Inc. (Toronto, Canada), unpublished observations, 2004-2007.




All that said,  there is a somewhat “official”  International table of GI’s  http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/76/1/5.full.pdf+html

http://nutritiondata.self.com has taken this information and used some heavy math to create a Glycemic Load Estimator that extrapolates from this data with reasonable accuracy (standard error of 5.5)  and is searchable for thousands of foods in their database.
This is my GO TO place for nutrition information.
     When you search a food they list the estimated GL, and loads of other data there as well.
They don't give you the GI though, so if you want that, then multiply the GL X 100 and divide by the net carbohydrates.  It will of course be an estimate too.





*The University of Sydney  http://www.glycemicindex.com/index.php  doesn’t give a list, but is searchable and provides where their data comes from.

** Snickers bars and such, can be lower GI than plain carbohydrates because the protein and fat will lower rate of digestion.


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Robert
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

I came across this dude, who has compiled a lot of data into interactive charts.
https://public.tableau.com/profile/publ … sh-confirm

While this is not a GI list, this goes a bit deeper by including GL and protein to determine insulin response.

Thought It might be useful. A pictorial way of viewing the various factors involved.

NOTE: checkout snickers vs oatmeal, GI vs insulin response. smile


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Act2Ally
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

Cool! Thanks.

Can't find that "snickers vs oatmeal" .. also, didn't you say it wasn't GI? : ) The closest I find is this GL and FII graph, is that what you mean?

hmmm.. can't see oatmeal anywhere.. let me put my dark glasses. cool


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Robert
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

I equated porridge with oatmeal.

This is not a GI list as was requested.
It does provide GI data if you select the individual foods.  The comparison has to be done manually.

I specifically make mention oatmeal vs snickers only for consistency with the example used above, and that insulin response is not wholly reliant on GI.


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Act2Ally
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

oh.. thanks, English is not my native language.

> and that insulin response is not wholly reliant on GI.

True. I grind my own corn, which has a bad rap here (tongue snapback warning!lol), but grinding it oneself keeps the fiber (what is it called in English? bran?) so it's less worse than refined at least. : ) Not to mention it's used as a thin layer for other stuff anyways, so never high quantity either.


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Alex
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

All I got was:

{"error":{"message":"No handler found for GET /seo/profile/publish/foodinsulinindexanalysis/insulinloadvsFII"}}

...was it something I ate?  :  )
AR


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Act2Ally
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Re: Complex Carbohydrates and GI

> ...was it something I ate?  :  )

LOOOL xDDD

Alex, I think it is a blocking thing 'cause I got that too and had to allow some scripts? Then again inside.. But just those 2 seemed to be enough; )


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