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Alex
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I've Made My Mind Up Now

Long time,
But here in the Workshop/stuff by members are the first 6 chapters and some bits, of 'I've Made My Mind Up Now'. Hope you enjoy.
There are more to come, but time once again overtakes me.

You may, f you wish, blame climate change for all delays; the warmer it gets, the more likely I am to be out in the woods and gardens, not typing.  :  )

I suspect productivity to rise as soon as the weather turns to rat shit.

Lots of love to y'all,
AR


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Alex
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Many thanks to Scal the wizard for sussing out the formatting issue with chapter 7!
And thanks for all the feedback folks  :  )
Enjoy,

AR


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Robert
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

I'm really liking the new perspective this format provides and am finding clarity in areas I did not realize were cloudy. 

In Chapter3, it says
'Fresh' means food that was picked, caught or killed less than three days ago, 

I've read through the footnote material for chapter 3 and can't find where this reference to a 3 day limit comes from.    I'd appreciate any guidance pointing me in the direction this information came from.
Specifically I'm interested in what the epigenetic triggering mechanism is, and what happens to the food in terms of loss of triggering capacity after 3 days. Is it a limitation to all/most foods or specific types? (I'm assuming a protein/enzyme degradation of some kind)

If so, could sprouts and microgreens be used to maintain signalling of an enriched environment through winter months?  Grains and beans offer poor nutrition, but sprouted could they offer this benefit of fresh food signalling?

Enjoying, Thanks for the quality input!
Robert


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Alex
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Fresh means newly picked (fruit nuts & veg), or newly butchered (meat), or newly caught (fish) foods. It usually means unprocessed and describes the time when food is at its very best and hasn’t been travelling far or sitting too long on display. The three day rule is from personal experience of living 'rambo style' with a bunch of horse-drawn travellers. If you just caught it or just butchered it or just picked it, it will be safe for 3 days if you store it properly (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe ) but after that, it becomes dehydrated and starts getting 'stale', with risk of bacteria/fungal degradation and it stops tasting nice. If you cook it, you get another 3 days, but after that you have to feed it to the chickens.

There are exceptions. Nuts, apples and spuds dehydrate more slowly so you got weeks or months to eat them. Bean sprouts only last about a day, fresh fish two days.

There is a constant loss of nutrients and increase in susceptibility to pathogens from the moment you pick or kill food. Fresh food also tastes a lot better.

Nuts, dried legumes, dried fruits and dried oats are a pretty good way to get through times with less fresh produce available. Certainly you can sprout a lot of legumes for variety. Seafood is available all year round in temperate climates though, as are small mammals and a lot of birds, which may be why poultry is a traditionally favored food for thanksgiving and winter solstice? We ran out of wild boar, maybe?  :  )

https://fruitandvegetable.ucdavis.edu/files/197179.pdf

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio … ue_of_food

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio … -_A_review

this one is quite intriguing:
https://www.elsevier.com/connect/your-v … t-and-dark

yum yum,
AR


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Alex
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Hi dudes,
Chapter 8 is now available.
Enjoy  :  )
AR


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Robert
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Alex wrote:

Fresh means newly picked (fruit nuts & veg), or newly butchered (meat), or newly caught (fish) foods. It usually means unprocessed and describes the time when food is at its very best and hasn’t been travelling far or sitting too long on display. The three day rule is from personal experience of living 'rambo style' with a bunch of horse-drawn travellers.

Rambo style, makes me think you can eat stuff that would make a billy goat puke.  smile
https://youtu.be/D5exIfDt2O8?t=16

99% of my food I grow or hunt myself, but as most of the game I get is too large to eat in three days I need a bigger party.  Legislation also gets in the way, there are a lot of controls placed on what and when different species can be hunted/fished. 
Traveling horse-drawn, sounds like a blast! how did you come about doing it?



If you just caught it or just butchered it or just picked it, it will be safe for 3 days if you store it properly (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe ) but after that, it becomes dehydrated and starts getting 'stale', with risk of bacteria/fungal degradation and it stops tasting nice. If you cook it, you get another 3 days, but after that you have to feed it to the chickens.

There are exceptions. Nuts, apples and spuds dehydrate more slowly so you got weeks or months to eat them. Bean sprouts only last about a day, fresh fish two days.

There is a constant loss of nutrients and increase in susceptibility to pathogens from the moment you pick or kill food. Fresh food also tastes a lot better.

Agree it tastes entirely different fresh.   There is a common practice around these parts to hang meat for a few weeks before butchering.  This aging supposedly makes it more tender, and I suppose it does align with anthropological evidence of how we ate carcasses over weeks or months, but I prefer it fresh or even frozen to aged. 
I was under the misconception three days was due to some particular signalling molecule that is lost, indicating an impoverished environment thereby initiating a deleterious epigenome change.
Is it more accurate to think of it as an experiential signal?  For example if I was to take a steak out of the freezer, would it be beneficial to carry it out into the woods and come back with it?  Does having a freezer full of nutrition speak to the unconscious mind plenty of resources, or does it imply hoarding of food due to scarcity?



Nuts, dried legumes, dried fruits and dried oats are a pretty good way to get through times with less fresh produce available. Certainly you can sprout a lot of legumes for variety. Seafood is available all year round in temperate climates though, as are small mammals and a lot of birds, which may be why poultry is a traditionally favored food for thanksgiving and winter solstice? We ran out of wild boar, maybe?  :  )

Incidentally wild boar are not native around here but have been moving into the area.  They are not allowed to be legally hunted though, there no season for them. 
I will need to move much farther away from prying eyes, or focus on smaller game that is allowed to be harvested year round, (which isn't much). I could easily live on turkey fish geese and rabbit here year round if the kings guards weren't about.








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Alex
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Re:Rambo style, makes me think you can eat stuff that would make a billy goat puke.

I did eat a billy goat once  :  )   In a curry. It was pretty good. But it's mainly rabbit. I have tried chocolate ants and fried locusts. The worst things I ever tried were Tripe (first place winner of disgusting), and a synthetic salted caramel 'ice cream' from a UK supermarket which smelled like wet dogs and tasted (to me) like rancid cabbage.

Re: Traveling horse-drawn, sounds like a blast! how did you come about doing it?

I met some folks doing it and it sounded like a laugh. It's great if you're with friends, but sadly a lot of groups are just as mental as ordinary folks who live in houses, and just like everywhere else, a few nutters spoil things for everyone. I also don't like using animals to cart my stuff around. It's my stuff, why should they have to drag it about in bondage gear? Bit too creepy for me.


Re: I was under the misconception three days was due to some particular signalling molecule that is lost, indicating an impoverished environment thereby initiating a deleterious epigenome change.
Is it more accurate to think of it as an experiential signal?

The environment is where we get our experience from, so it's probably both. Non-fresh food gets invaded by bacteria and starts to break down, and we almost certainly are aware of biodegradation regardless of how fresh something looks, so there's unconscious molecular signaling going on long before we smell anything wrong. Ingestion of stale food (or foods with low nutrition) is likely to kick off genome changes as well because the system is getting 'famine' signals (ingestion of most things causes epigenetic change, of course, but we want the good ones).

Re: Frozen food:  It's intriguing but we don't yet know enough to ascertain whether frozen food is unconsciously recognized as 'real' because experiments haven't been done. However, the Inuit's food is frozen shortly after it dies by default so I would expect we do view it as proper food.  Also storing large amounts is normal as normally it would be feeding a tribe, a clan or at least a family. Having forty freezers full of food is probably hoarding if you live alone (sorta like a squirrel with OCD)  :  )

If you caught the meat and brought it home in the first place to put it in the freezer, that's an archetypal behavior and would be beneficial. (Obviously, Inuit folks don't need a freezer) If you ordered it to be delivered it doesn't count. Also other archetypal activity like skinning meat and doing something with the hides (goatskin makes great bags) is a bonus.

...What happens if a wild boar accidentally falls into a deep pit full of spikes?   LOL
Best,
AR


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Robert
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

RE: I have tried chocolate ants and fried locusts. The worst things I ever tried were Tripe (first place winner of disgusting), and a synthetic salted caramel 'ice cream' from a UK supermarket which smelled like wet dogs and tasted (to me) like rancid cabbage.

The only insects I've (intentionally and knowingly) tried were mealworms fried in butter.  They tasted like butter.  Thinking about lobsters and crabs though, aren't they really just big aquatic bugs? So I've enjoyed them too.  Again with butter.  I'm sensing a theme here. 
Rancid cabbage I've had too.  It was called sauerkraut.


Re: .... sadly a lot of groups are just as mental as ordinary folks who live in houses, and just like everywhere else, a few nutters spoil things for everyone.

Nutters abound for sure, and yet allies are found in surprising places.  This past summer I met up with some horse traveling people myself.  Amish they called themselves. Quite a pleasant bunch they are, with a strong sense of community and far more grounded in reality than the average 'ordinary folk' around these parts.

RE:  there's unconscious molecular signaling going on long before we smell anything wrong.

What signaling would kick in prior to smell?  Unconscious smells? 

RE:  Also storing large amounts is normal as normally it would be feeding a tribe, a clan or at least a family. Having forty freezers full of food is probably hoarding if you live alone (sorta like a squirrel with OCD) 

Well it wasnt easy but with buying bigger freezers I managed to get it down to 39 so OCD cured. Lol


RE:   other archetypal activity like skinning meat and doing something with the hides (goatskin makes great bags) is a bonus...

It does feel wasteful leaving the hides unused I've tanned some rabbit skins, but not made anything of them yet. 


RE:  What happens if a wild boar accidentally falls into a deep pit full of spikes? 
 
It depends.... Did one of the Kings guards fall into the pit prior to the boar? smile

Cheers!
Robert


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Alex
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Re: I've Made My Mind Up Now

Re: What signaling would kick in prior to smell?  Unconscious smells?

Unconscious sensory information via multiple senses arrives before we get the conscious version. Our sensory info only becomes conscious after we interpret it, although we do so really fast when necessary.
When input is too fast to translate (such as a small insect heading rapidly towards the eyeball) we don't bother making it conscious, just unconsciously blink to deflect it, for we are mere humans and have a fairly low visual processing speed  :  )   ...If we were mere cats, processing visuals at imax speed, we'd see the insect coming.

On the topic of manual skills, I'm in the process of turning a fleece into a jumper using a bamboo stick and my fingers  :  ) What is most surprising is how heavy and warm it is, and also how much fleece is got from just four sheep!
AR


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